Fish Consumption Advisory

Neuse River System2017-07-06T14:14:33+00:00

Neuse River System

Affected Counties

Wake

Affected Sites

  • Brier Creek
  • Crabtree Creek
  • Lake Crabtree
  • Little Brier Creek
  • Neuse River
  • Rocky Branch
  • Walnut Creek

Fish to avoid:

Do not eat any fish from Brier Creek or Little Brier Creek. Avoid the following fish in Crabtree Creek, Lake Crabtree, Neuse River, Rocky Branch, and Walnut Creek.

Blue Catfish

Blue Catfish

Bowfin (Blackfish)

Bowfin (Blackfish)

Brown Bullhead

Bullhead Catfishes

Chain Pickerel (Jackfish)

Chain Pickerel (Jackfish)

Channel Catfish

Channel Catfish

Common Carp

Common Carp

Flathead Catfish

Flathead Catfish

Largemouth Bass

Largemouth Bass

Warmouth

Warmouth

White catfish

White Catfish

Yellow Perch

Yellow Perch

Generally, choose these fish from the central part of the state:

Black Crappie

Black Crappie

Bluegill Sunfish (Brim)

Bluegill Sunfish (Brim)

Redbreast Sunfish (Brim)

Redbreast Sunfish (Brim)

Redear Sunfish (Brim)

Redear Sunfish (Brim)

White Bass

White Bass

White Crappie

White Crappie

White Perch

White Perch

Pollutants

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and Mercury

Advisories for Affected Sites

Brier Creek

Date issued: May 7, 2004
Site: Downstream of Brier Creek Reservoir
Advisory: Do not eat any fish from Brier Creek. High levels of PCBs have been found in the fish. Swimming, boating, and other recreational activities present no known significant health risks from PCBs and are not affected by this advisory. PCB-related risks, if any, from these activities have been shown to be negligible. If future testing reveals new information, then new advice will be given and new signs will be issued.

Crabtree Creek

Date issued: March 31, 2006
Site: Above Lake Crabtree and below Lake Crabtree to where it enters the Neuse River
Advisory: Limit consumption of carp, catfish, and largemouth bass from Crabtree Creek to no more than one meal per month. High levels of PCBs have been found in carp, catfish, and largemouth bass from these waters. A meal of fish is approximately six (6) ounces of uncooked fish.

Lake Crabtree

Date issued: May 7, 2004
Advisory: Do not eat carp or catfish from Lake Crabtree. High levels of PCBs have been found in these fish. Limit consumption of all other fish from Lake Crabtree to no more than one meal per month. When in doubt about the fish species, do not eat any of the fish. Swimming, boating, and other recreational activities present no known significant health risks from PCBs and are not affected by this advisory. PCB-related risks, if any, from these activities have been shown to be negligible. If future testing reveals new information, then new advice will be given and new signs will be issued. A meal of fish is approximately six (6) ounces of uncooked fish.

Little Brier Creek

Date issued: December 8, 2003
Site: Downstream of Brier Creek Parkway. Includes tributaries to Little Brier Creek and Brier Creek Reservoir
Advisory: Do not eat fish from Little Brier Creek (downstream of Brier Creek Parkway), its tributaries, and Brier Creek Reservoir. Fish from these waters are not safe to eat. High levels of PCBs have been found in the fish.

Neuse River

Date issued: April 2, 2008
Site: Just below Crabtree Creek to Auburn-Knightdale Road
Advisory: Limit consumption of carp and catfish to no more than one meal per month. High levels of PCBs may be found in carp and catfish from these waters. A meal of fish is approximately six (6) ounces of uncooked fish.

Rocky Branch

Date issued: April 2, 2008
Site: Just upstream of the Neuse River
Advisory: Limit consumption of carp and catfish to no more than one meal per month and limit consumption of all other fish to no more than one meal per week from these waters. High levels of PCBs may be found in these fish. A meal of fish is approximately six (6) ounces of uncooked fish.

Walnut Creek

Date issued: April 2, 2008
Site: Just upstream of the Neuse River
Advisory: Limit consumption of carp and catfish to no more than one meal per month and limit consumption of all other fish to no more than one meal per week from these waters. High levels of PCBs may be found in these fish. A meal of fish is approximately six (6) ounces of uncooked fish.

In addition to the site-specific fish consumption advisories listed above, there is a statewide advisory for the consumption of fish high in mercury, including Largemouth Bass.