Potential mangrove disease in Jamaica

We recently posted about partnering with Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation (KSLOF) to bring our mangrove disease research into the classroom in The Bahamas. Just this past week, students in grade 11 Biology at William Knibb High School in Jamaica were also able to experience our mangrove disease research in their classrooms as part of […]

By | 2017-05-16T14:54:40+00:00 May 11th, 2017|Categories: Mangroves and Creeks|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

Glass Sponge Reef Cruise- Watch Live!

Dr. Stephanie K. Archer has been studying glass sponge reefs in British Colombia since leaving the lab here at NC State. Beginning Thursday, May 12, she will be on a research cruise exploring the Hectate Strait glass sponge reef. There will be a live feed of the dives on the reef at this

By | 2017-05-22T12:36:34+00:00 May 10th, 2017|Categories: Deep Sea|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Preliminary insights on how mangrove pathogen interacts with salt

We were fortunate enough to have a high school student from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics volunteer in our lab at NC State. She designed two experiments to help us understand how the fungus causing mangrove lesions interacts with salt, one of the abiotic stressors we think likely contributed to the mangrove die-off.

First, she tested if […]

By | 2017-05-08T14:25:08+00:00 May 8th, 2017|Categories: Mangroves and Creeks, Undergraduate Research|0 Comments

New summary of mangrove die-off research

Recently we posted about bringing our mangrove disease research into the classroom. In addition to bringing field and lab skills into the classroom, we also developed a blog post for students to read and analyze as an addition to the mangrove education curriculum developed by Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation.  You can check […]

Mangrove outreach in the classroom

We recently began a collaboration with the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation where we are bringing our disease research on mangroves into the classroom. We worked with Amy Heemsoth, director of education at Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, to develop a lesson plan in which students help collect and isolate disease from mangrove leaves. We recently piloted this […]

And another: ‘Have Scientists Been Overestimating our Toll on Reef Sharks?’

Shark populations are declining worldwide and  shark awareness and conservation is necessary. However, some interesting news from a recently published paper suggests that we might be overestimating the density of sharks required on reefs to resemble pristine reefs. This is very exciting, as shark researchers and conservationists’ goals are now potentially more realistic. Read more in this short (650 words, […]

By | 2017-03-30T10:30:20+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Overfishing, sharks|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Are we overestimating sea turtle populations?

A new paper out last month presents the possibility that typical sea turtle population assessment methods via foot patrols may be overestimating nesting populations by as much as a factor of 2. You can view it here.

The paper uses satellite tracking of nesting green turtles (Chelonia mydas) at their study site to show that they lay an average of […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 24th, 2017|Categories: Endangered species, herpetology, Turtles|0 Comments

Spider Crabs Could Clean Your Fish’s House

Another cool study out of the Cape Eleuthera Institute (blog post link here). There is relatively little known about this species, despite how common they seem to be in many reef habitats. This is an interesting way to utilize them in an aquaculture context.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Crabs|0 Comments