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  • red mangrove roots

Transforming seawalls with fake mangroves

A research group from University of Kansas are investigating an interesting way to transform manmade structures in our waterways. Dr. Keith Van de Reit and students have added fake red mangrove panels to a seawall in Fort Myers, FL. They plan to monitor the fake mangroves to see whether they will attract marine organisms that utilize mangrove roots for […]

By |December 23rd, 2016|Categories: Mangroves and Creeks, Restoration|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
  • fringe red mangroves

Mangroves worth billions just by capturing Carbon

A recent study found that mangroves within Everglades National Park store between $2 billion and $3.4 billion dollars of Carbon. See abstract below and links to popular news articles here and here.

“Old growth mangroves in existing protected areas store more carbon than restored forests or plantations. Carbon storage in such forests has economic value independent of additionality, offering opportunities […]

By |December 22nd, 2016|Categories: Mangroves and Creeks|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Exotic Termite Introduction to Abaco

Came across this short paper about a termite introduction on Abaco. Here is another paper by the same author that describes how the initial introduction of this species in Florida was one of the first exotic introductions for any termite species. And if you are a real termite geek, here is the taxonomic guide for the group […]

By |December 21st, 2016|Categories: Invasive Species|0 Comments

Great news for the world’s marine mammals

I am always excited to report positive news (reported at length here).  Starting in the new year, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will require countries exporting seafood to the United States to demonstrate that their fisheries comply with the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).  The US is the world’s largest seafood importer and the MMPA is among […]

By |December 20th, 2016|Categories: Current Events, Endangered species, Marine Mammals, Overfishing, Policy|1 Comment

Summary of on-going mangrove die-off research

Here is a video update on the on-going mangrove die-off research. See video here.

By |December 16th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Mangroves and Creeks|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments
  • Seagrass

Sea Bees Pollinate Turtle Grass

A recent study documented the role of “sea bees” (tiny crustaceans and polychaetes commonly found in seagrass beds)  in the pollination of Turtle grass (Thalassia testudinum).  Before this study,  it was thought that Turtle grass was only pollinated by water-flow! See the article abstract below for more information and video of sea bees here!

“Pollen transport by water-flow (hydrophily) […]

By |December 12th, 2016|Categories: seagrass|Tags: , , , |1 Comment

In the News: ‘Marine Biologist Suggests Conservation Of Bahamas’ Seagrass Habitats’

Short article in the Tribune242 on the importance of seagrass ecosystem conservation. As we have shown why seagrass meadows are critical to protect for nursery habitats(see here), this short article discusses the dependency lobsters have on theses ecosystems. “Dr Nicholas Higgs, Deputy Director of the Marine Institute at Plymouth University, England, said that the ‘high productivity’ of local […]

By |December 11th, 2016|Categories: conservation, lobster, seagrass|Tags: , |1 Comment

National Geographic: Mapping Abaco Blue Holes

One of the most unique natural features that can be found on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas are blue holes. Located along Abaco’s shorelines or inland within the thick of Abaco’s pine forests, these underwater caverns are incredibly extensive and a gem to share. Right now, National Geographic is teaming up with local divers, scientists, and schools to begin mapping the blue hole system in south Abaco. This cave system is potentially the most extensive island cave system in the world. Check out their daily blog HERE to see short videos, shared experiences, and outreach they are doing as local schools take a field trip with Nat Geo.

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By |December 7th, 2016|Categories: Blue Holes, Caves, conservation, Education|Tags: |1 Comment

Reminder: Nassau grouper closed season begins December 1 in The Bahamas

Officially law last year (see here), Nassau grouper fishing season is closed in The Bahamas from December 1st to February 28th. This is to help populations recover and stop unsustainable fishing practices on their spawning aggregations. Let us all do our part and help spread the word.

By |December 1st, 2016|Categories: Fish, Regulations|Tags: , |1 Comment

Sailfish provide clue to the evolution of group hunting

This video is really cool.

By |November 15th, 2016|Categories: Current Events, Fish, Uncategorized|0 Comments