Droning On (In a Good Way)

Enie Hensel’s drone research featured by NCSU (story here and paper here). Nice job Enie! The paper Abstract to follow….

Large-bodied animals, megafauna, are disproportionately threatened and yet, remain relatively difficult to monitor. This is particularly true in the ocean. Consumer-grade drones have high definition imagery and offer a non-invasive way to monitor a subset of marine megafauna, especially […]

By | 2018-11-26T10:11:16+00:00 November 26th, 2018|Categories: Featured, marine protected areas, sharks, Turtles|0 Comments

Monitoring marine megafauna from the sky

Check out this short press release (Link Here) for our newest paper “Using a small, consumer-grade drone to identify and count marine megafauna in shallow habitats“.  An example of how drones are an affordable and non-invasive monitoring tool for researchers and conservation managers. This project was funded by Save Our Seas Foundation  […]

Sargassum Accumulations on Caribbean Beaches

Over the last 8 years or so, many Caribbean Islands have been challenged by massive Sargassum algae accumulations on beaches (a Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute fact sheet here, and a high resolution link to the poster here). These accumulations may have many deleterious effects on species that utilize beach habitat, including for nesting turtles. See for instance

By | 2018-11-14T19:59:00+00:00 May 7th, 2018|Categories: Beaches, Featured, Sargassum, Turtles, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Thoughts on recent animal introductions to Abaco

A recent issue of the journal, International Reptile Conservation Federation (IRCF), contains two short articles featuring recent observations of two new species introductions to Abaco. Below, I relay these findings and offer a few thoughts on what these recent observations suggest for the future of Abaco’s fauna. […]

By | 2018-11-22T09:17:01+00:00 August 18th, 2017|Categories: Featured, herpetology, Invasive Species, Lizards, Turtles, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Ecological regime shift in the West Atlantic?

Recently, large collaborations between sea turtle monitoring programs in the West Atlantic have identified regional declines in growth rates for loggerheads, hawksbills, and greens. Data were used from in-water capture-recapture studies. Karen Bjorndal of the University of Florida has taken the helm on three papers that address the trends for each of these species.

Notably, all species exhibited increases in growth rates […]

Are we overestimating sea turtle populations?

A new paper out last month presents the possibility that typical sea turtle population assessment methods via foot patrols may be overestimating nesting populations by as much as a factor of 2. You can view it here.

The paper uses satellite tracking of nesting green turtles (Chelonia mydas) at their study site to show that they lay an average of […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 24th, 2017|Categories: Endangered species, herpetology, Turtles|0 Comments

Tracking offshore migrations

Satellite tracking data is coming in for the 3 hawksbill sea turtles that received Platform Terminal Transmitters just over a month ago on Long Island, Antigua. The transmitters have 2 “saltwater switches” that, when exposed to air as the turtle surfaces to breathe, trigger the transmission of its location and stored sensor data (temperature, depth). So far we have been tracking […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 September 19th, 2016|Categories: Endangered species, migration, Turtles|Tags: , , |2 Comments

Hawksbill Hatchling Season in Antigua

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Shortly after 2am on July 24th, the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project in Antigua observed our first hawksbill sea turtle hatchlings of the season! Hawksbills typically lay around 150 eggs that will incubate in their sandy chambers for 50-60 days. After hatching, the turtles will rest for one to two days while […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 August 27th, 2016|Categories: Endangered species, herpetology, Turtles|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Satellite tracking sea turtles

This month we are planning to deploy 3 satellite tracking devices onto 3 hawksbill females. These are known as Platform Terminal Transmitters (PTTs). They provide information on the offshore movements of sea turtles that are otherwise near impossible to study. Roughly 10 years ago, the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project(JBHP) deployed 3 PTTs, so it will be interesting to revisit the research in […]

By | 2016-08-09T21:49:55+00:00 August 9th, 2016|Categories: Endangered species, herpetology, Turtles|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

One month into hawksbill nesting season

The start of July was the one month mark of our hawksbill monitoring season in Antigua. While over 29 years of monitoring (1987-2015) there has been a significant long-term increase in nesting numbers, June 2016 had a puzzlingly low amount of activity relative to previous Junes. We had 15 fewer nests than in June 2015 (24 vs. 39), as well as 8 […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:53+00:00 July 4th, 2016|Categories: herpetology, Turtles|Tags: , |0 Comments