Encouraging Comments on Conch Conservation

Encouraging comments from Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Michael Pintard following the recent study on a potential collapse in the conch fishery. I met Minister Pintard recently when a Bahamian delegation visited North Carolina, and he was especially interested in our creek restoration research (see here and here for instance) and the involvement of Bahamian students in […]

By | 2019-01-15T08:43:09-05:00 January 15th, 2019|Categories: Conch, Enforcement, Featured, Overfishing, Regulations|2 Comments

Will The Bahamas Have Conch in Twenty Years?

An excellent review paper on the status on the conch fishery in The Bahamas, based on research spanning more than 22 years. Much of this research associated with the organization Community Conch (www.communityconch.org). At the end of the paper find some specific management recommendations, and I include the Abstract below which provides a nice summary…

Broad-scale […]

By | 2019-01-13T10:27:04-05:00 January 10th, 2019|Categories: Conch, Featured, marine protected areas, Overfishing, Regulations|0 Comments

At the Nexus of People and Basic Science

Our own Jake Allgeier has a feature blog post in Science, the world’s foremost scientific journal (link here). Great to see his research and outreach in Haiti being recognized!

By | 2018-11-22T09:11:16-05:00 November 22nd, 2018|Categories: conservation, Education, Featured, Fish, Fishery management, Haiti, Overfishing|0 Comments

Illegal Harvest and Colonial Governance

Each summer NCSU professors Nils Peterson and Brian Langerhans teach a course at Forfar Field Station. As part of this course, they always include a sociological study on Andros. This year they looked at local peoples’ opinions on illegal harvesting and use their thoughts to speculate on some of the drivers of this issue. An easy […]

By | 2018-11-19T22:01:13-05:00 November 19th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Overfishing, Policy, Regulations|0 Comments

And another: ‘Have Scientists Been Overestimating our Toll on Reef Sharks?’

Shark populations are declining worldwide and  shark awareness and conservation is necessary. However, some interesting news from a recently published paper suggests that we might be overestimating the density of sharks required on reefs to resemble pristine reefs. This is very exciting, as shark researchers and conservationists’ goals are now potentially more realistic. Read more in this short (650 words, […]

By | 2017-03-30T10:30:20-05:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Overfishing, sharks|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Fish pee on coral reefs in the Caribbean makes Canadian Broadcasting Company

An interview I did a few months ago for Quarks and Quirks on CBC radio recently aired.  Yes, of course, it is more about fish pee, but I thought I would post it all the same.  It is pretty funny. Scroll down a bit for the actual interview.

What Fish are Left in the Caribbean?

Cool new study by John Bruno’s lab at the University of North Carolina. They surveyed sites across the Caribbean region and use these data to project back to how many fish there used to be before the fishing pressure. Here is a video summary of the paper from the authors, including footage from The Bahamas. Also, some popular press […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51-05:00 March 2nd, 2017|Categories: Overfishing, sharks|0 Comments

Great news for the world’s marine mammals

I am always excited to report positive news (reported at length here).  Starting in the new year, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will require countries exporting seafood to the United States to demonstrate that their fisheries comply with the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).  The US is the world’s largest seafood importer and the MMPA is among […]

By | 2016-12-20T17:25:35-05:00 December 20th, 2016|Categories: Current Events, Endangered species, Marine Mammals, Overfishing, Policy|1 Comment

Recent work on Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations asks us to rethink current fishing regulations

An exciting new publication just came out helping us better understand Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas (article here). Using acoustic telemetry data, Dr. Craig Dahlgren and others recorded the movements of different sized Nassau grouper to examine when and where individuals would migrate to spawning aggregations. They found that individuals did not migrate to aggregation sites until they […]