Hope for economically important Caribbean reefs sharks in The Bahamas

A guest post from Oliver Shipley at the Cape Eleuthera Institute. Photos courtesy of Sean Williams. Thanks Oliver!

Across the Caribbean, overexploitation has led to growing concern regarding the fate of apex predator populations, particularly sharks, which constitute an important structural component of many marine ecosystems. In 2011 The Bahamas outlawed the commercial fishing, and trade of any shark related […]

By | 2017-03-19T11:09:27+00:00 March 19th, 2017|Categories: migration, sharks|0 Comments

Tarpon swim farther that you do

A blog post from Bonefish and Tarpon Trust on the vast extent of tarpon movement patterns. The take home message is, like for so many large marine species, the extent that international collaborations are needed to develop effective conservation strategies.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 17th, 2017|Categories: Fish, migration|0 Comments

Tracking offshore migrations

Satellite tracking data is coming in for the 3 hawksbill sea turtles that received Platform Terminal Transmitters just over a month ago on Long Island, Antigua. The transmitters have 2 “saltwater switches” that, when exposed to air as the turtle surfaces to breathe, trigger the transmission of its location and stored sensor data (temperature, depth). So far we have been tracking […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 September 19th, 2016|Categories: Endangered species, migration, Turtles|Tags: , , |2 Comments

A Recorded History of Plover Jonesy

Verbatim from our local reporter. Amazing how far that small of a bird can travel.

  1. Banded as an adult male on 6/4/15 on the coast of Rhode Island by Peter Paton (Professor, Dept. of Natural Resources Science, Univ. of Rhode Island).
  2. Last detected up north on July 16 in southern Rhode Island.  Unsuccessfully attempted to nest at Sandy Point, RI.
  3. Spotted by intrepid […]
By | 2015-11-04T14:12:19+00:00 November 3rd, 2015|Categories: Beaches, Birds, development, migration|0 Comments

Piping Plovers at Winding Bay

Local report on plovers on the Winding Bay beach……

I walked Winding Bay beach on Thursday and saw 18 piping plovers.  One of them was banded, which was pretty exciting – Todd Pover thinks probably in Massachusetts.  This photo is not a great photo, but there  are AT LEAST 8 piping plovers in it – shows how hard they are […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:02:10+00:00 October 20th, 2015|Categories: Beaches, Birds, migration|3 Comments

Sargassum and nesting turtles

A quick update from new NCSU graduate student Andrew Maurer on the sargassum mats in the Eastern Caribbean.  Thanks Andrew.

“Huge influxes of sargassum seaweed on coasts and nearshore waters throughout the Caribbean are drawing more and more attention from all sectors, especially conservation organizations. There are benefits to beaches such as stabilization and vast nutrient provision. Oceanic sargassum is also […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:02:12+00:00 July 3rd, 2015|Categories: Beaches, citizen science, Endangered species, herpetology, migration, tourism, Turtles|0 Comments

Hawksbill Nesting Project

New NCSU graduate student Andy Maurer sent in an update on his research on Antigua.  Cool stuff…..

Hawksbill nesting season with the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project in Antigua is well under way. After 3 weeks of monitoring, we have had 25 nests laid by 21 females. Many more to come. There have been 8 first time nesters, or neophytes, already this […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:02:12+00:00 June 23rd, 2015|Categories: Beaches, herpetology, migration, Turtles|0 Comments

New Hawksbill Project

A BBC story on an important hawksbill nesting location in Antigua.  Timely, as we have just accepted a new student, Andrew Maurer, into the NCSU graduate program.  Andrew will conduct his field work at this site, looking at factors that affect nesting success in hawksbills.  Some of the hawksbills that take up residence in The Bahamas, may well have […]

By | 2015-04-26T09:59:55+00:00 April 26th, 2015|Categories: Beaches, herpetology, migration, Turtles|0 Comments