Exuma Park Nominated for International GLORES Award

Here is a note from my colleague Craig Dahlgren that explains the award itself and the commenting process. Would be great for The Bahamas to be recognized for this……

The Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park (ECLSP) is one of nine MPAs to be nominated for international recognition in the Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES).  The GLORES initiative were established […]

By | 2018-07-22T11:16:13+00:00 July 22nd, 2018|Categories: marine protected areas, Regulations|0 Comments

Global Evaluation of Shark Sanctuaries

An interesting recent paper evaluating the efficacy of shark sanctuaries, including in The Bahamas. The paper is a little long, but easily accessible. It is straight forward to scroll through sections to find items of most interest (e.g., human uses or conservation awareness). The full paper summary pasted below.

Due to well-documented declines in many shark populations there is increasing […]

By | 2018-03-18T10:28:12+00:00 March 18th, 2018|Categories: Endangered species, marine protected areas, sharks|0 Comments

Bahamas Conch in the News

We’ve shared posts about conch populations before but a new study led by Dr. Kough from Shedd Aquarium found that the conch population declined 71% in 2016 compared to a 2011 survey in the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park. View the full study here and a popular news article here.

‘New Virtual Dive Gallery Puts National Marine Sanctuaries at the Tip of Your Fingers’

In case anyone needs a quick break, take a virtual snorkel break with NOAA’s beautiful photography gallery.  HERE is a recent article NOAA posted for its debut and the the virtual tours can be found HERE. Enjoy.

 

By | 2017-05-16T15:19:13+00:00 May 16th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Coral, marine protected areas|0 Comments

Fish pee on coral reefs in the Caribbean makes Canadian Broadcasting Company

An interview I did a few months ago for Quarks and Quirks on CBC radio recently aired.  Yes, of course, it is more about fish pee, but I thought I would post it all the same.  It is pretty funny. Scroll down a bit for the actual interview.

Recent work on Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations asks us to rethink current fishing regulations

An exciting new publication just came out helping us better understand Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas (article here). Using acoustic telemetry data, Dr. Craig Dahlgren and others recorded the movements of different sized Nassau grouper to examine when and where individuals would migrate to spawning aggregations. They found that individuals did not migrate to aggregation sites until they […]

Hilarious new educational film on our research in Haiti – in Haitian Creole

We have been working with Loggerhead Productions for the past few years on creating films and documentaries about our work in Haiti.  Recently Matt just finished a new education film on our local work in Haiti that we will be distributing around to schools and communities in the area where we are working around Ile A Vache, Haiti.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 September 21st, 2016|Categories: Artificial Reefs, Featured, Fish, Haiti, marine protected areas, Nutrients, Overfishing, Restoration|1 Comment

Fishing reduces fish pee on coral reefs

Yup, more about fish pee.  As a follow-up to work we have been conducting on the importance of fish excretion (pee) for coastal tropic ecosystems, we describe in a recent study how fishing pressure is reducing this source of nutrients by nearly half on coral reefs across the broader Caribbean. This study highlights an alternative way in which human […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 August 16th, 2016|Categories: Coral, Current Events, Global change, marine protected areas, Nutrients, Overfishing|0 Comments

Lessons from the International Coral Reef Symposium: “We Must Reduce Carbon Emissions”

Last week some 3000 coral reef scientists, including the world’s foremost leaders in all aspects of coral reef ecosystems, met in Honolulu to discuss the fate of coral reefs.  The goal of this convention, which is held every four years, was to focus on positive action towards improving reef ecosystems. Unfortunately, when studying coral reefs it is difficult to be optimistic. […]