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Ecological regime shift in the West Atlantic?

Recently, large collaborations between sea turtle monitoring programs in the West Atlantic have identified regional declines in growth rates for loggerheads, hawksbills, and greens. Data were used from in-water capture-recapture studies. Karen Bjorndal of the University of Florida has taken the helm on three papers that address the trends for each of these species.

Notably, all species exhibited increases in growth rates […]

Fish pee on coral reefs in the Caribbean makes Canadian Broadcasting Company

An interview I did a few months ago for Quarks and Quirks on CBC radio recently aired.  Yes, of course, it is more about fish pee, but I thought I would post it all the same.  It is pretty funny. Scroll down a bit for the actual interview.

Signs of resilience in pacific coral reefs

It is truly uplifting to find any positive news about the state of the worlds’ coral reefs anywhere.  A resent research survey found that the reefs around Phoenix Island, a region halfway between Fiji and Hawaii, were teaming with healthy coral.  These corals had previously been devastated in 2003, and had been slow to recover.  Scientists were worried that the recent […]

By |October 1st, 2016|Categories: Climate Change, Coral, Current Events, Global change|1 Comment

Fishing reduces fish pee on coral reefs

Yup, more about fish pee.  As a follow-up to work we have been conducting on the importance of fish excretion (pee) for coastal tropic ecosystems, we describe in a recent study how fishing pressure is reducing this source of nutrients by nearly half on coral reefs across the broader Caribbean. This study highlights an alternative way in which human […]

World squid and octopus populations on a rise

Finally some good news.  With all the drastic changes that are occurring in the worlds oceans, there are clear winners and losers.  A recent article has provided definitive proof that all cephalopods, a group that includes octopus, squid, and cuttlefish, are clear winners. Researchers concluded that cephalopods from New England to Japan have boomed since the 1950s.  What is interesting […]

By |July 29th, 2016|Categories: Climate Change, Current Events, Food, Global change, Overfishing|0 Comments

Lessons from the International Coral Reef Symposium: “We Must Reduce Carbon Emissions”

Last week some 3000 coral reef scientists, including the world’s foremost leaders in all aspects of coral reef ecosystems, met in Honolulu to discuss the fate of coral reefs.  The goal of this convention, which is held every four years, was to focus on positive action towards improving reef ecosystems. Unfortunately, when studying coral reefs it is difficult to be optimistic. […]

Bahamas MPAs Featured

In one of the top ecology journals. See page 2.

Guide to Science of Marine Protected Areas in The Bahamas

A nice summary document from the American Museum of Natural History.  And a related document on the health of New Providence coral reefs.

The emergence of “The Blob”

“The Blob” is a peculiar and persistent warm-water mass that has been hovering over the Northern Pacific on and off for the past few years.  Scientist don’t full understand how or why it is there, but it is having marked effects on both weather patterns (largely in the Pacific Northwest) and on local ecosystems.  In particular, the warm water prevents […]

By |April 5th, 2015|Categories: Climate Change, Current Events, Global change|0 Comments

Prehistoric bat extinctions in the Bahamas – if not climate, then…?

A recent paper in Scientific Reports (LINK to .pdf) examines the timing and cause of a major extinction event in the Caribbean. From the looks of the evidence presented in this paper, humans might be the culprit, not rising seas. Some of the samples used in this study were collected right on Abaco!

This U. Florida brief does a […]

By |January 23rd, 2015|Categories: Climate Change, Global change, Haiti|0 Comments