Are Dogs Cooler than Flamingos?

Kids on Andros Island seem to think so. Researchers from North Carolina State University authored this study, comparing kids’ preferences for animals in The Bahamas and North Carolina. The base question posed was: ““What are your five favorite kinds of wild animals that live in in The Bahamas?”. The most common answer for kids on Andros was…..dogs. Here is […]

By | 2017-12-28T05:48:50+00:00 December 28th, 2017|Categories: Andros Island, Featured, Invasive Species|0 Comments

New Study: Queen Conch Populations are Fragmented

A new study found that Queen conch populations are not mixing across the Caribbean suggesting that there are multiple distinct populations. These findings have implications for management of conch fisheries and suggest that local management of populations may be crucial! Check out a popular news article featuring this work here and a link to the original research […]

By | 2017-12-21T18:39:34+00:00 September 20th, 2017|Categories: Conch, Featured, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Thoughts on recent animal introductions to Abaco

A recent issue of the journal, International Reptile Conservation Federation (IRCF), contains two short articles featuring recent observations of two new species introductions to Abaco. Below, I relay these findings and offer a few thoughts on what these recent observations suggest for the future of Abaco’s fauna. […]

By | 2017-12-21T18:42:50+00:00 August 18th, 2017|Categories: Featured, herpetology, Invasive Species, Lizards, Turtles, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Hear the roar of the lionfish recorded for the first time

Here is a popular press piece (link here) on the first documented sound production in lionfish. The original paper well qualifies that these data are just preliminary, but very interesting what role this sound production may play. Here is a paragraph from the article with some speculation:

Sound is a critical component of fish social behaviour and sound production […]

By | 2017-12-21T18:46:18+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Categories: Featured, Invasive Species, lionfish|0 Comments

Fish pee on coral reefs in the Caribbean makes Canadian Broadcasting Company

An interview I did a few months ago for Quarks and Quirks on CBC radio recently aired.  Yes, of course, it is more about fish pee, but I thought I would post it all the same.  It is pretty funny. Scroll down a bit for the actual interview.

Sharks Can Make You Rich

New socio-economic study on the value of sharks in The Bahamas (paper here). The paper Abstract summarizes the findings well:

Elasmobranch populations in The Bahamas offer a unique juxtaposition to the widespread decline of many species around the world, largely due to management and conservation initiatives implemented over the last 25 years. Several industries have been built around the diverse […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 February 18th, 2017|Categories: economy, Featured, sharks, tourism|0 Comments

Lobster, clams and chemistry

Guest post from Nicholas Higgs at the University of Plymouth. Thanks Nick!

New research by Bahamian marine scientist Dr Nick Higgs and colleagues has shown that Caribbean spiny lobsters (aka crawfish) get a big chunk of their food from an unusual source. The lobsters hunt down a particular species of clam in seagrass beds that get their energy from chemosynthesis. This helps explain how lobsters […]

By | 2017-02-18T14:02:58+00:00 February 16th, 2017|Categories: Featured, lobster|0 Comments

‘What will happen to the Bahamas when all the Conch is gone?’

“Let’s think about tomorrow, there are some simple rules to follow: preservation, moderation, we need some Conchservation. Conch Gone!”

Under the direction of Lavado Stubbs, ConchBoy films, with several musicians, a new music video came out today to help the conservation of conch for The Bahamas (article here). A widespread effort between entertainers and several conservation and management organizations […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 January 13th, 2017|Categories: Conch, conservation, Current Events, Education, Featured|Tags: , , |1 Comment