Never Home Alone

A really fascinating new book by my colleague Rob Dunn – an absolute must read. It details the incredible world of life that lives in your homes. Here is the Amazon link and review.

Even when the floors are sparkling clean and the house seems silent, our domestic domain is wild beyond imagination. In Never Home Alone, biologist Rob Dunn introduces […]

By | 2018-11-14T19:55:24+00:00 November 12th, 2018|Categories: citizen science, Featured, Invasive Species, Invertebrates|0 Comments

A Fishwatcher’s Guide to Life, the Ocean and Everything

Came across this fun new book that alludes to, among so many other interesting natural history morsels, our research on fish “pee”.  Here are some quick excerpts: “… fish ecologist Jacob Allgeier spent years working out just how much coral reefs rely on fish pee. The practical side of his work … involved catching hundreds of fish species and carefully […]

By | 2018-10-18T12:49:55+00:00 October 18th, 2018|Categories: Current Events, Featured, Fish, Nutrients|0 Comments

Lost and Found: Israel Point Cave

A guest post from Ali Ball. What a cool find! Thanks Ali.

LOST AND FOUND: ISRAEL POINT CAVE

In July of 1904, American zoologist Glover M. Allen visited various caves in Abaco to collect bat specimens.

A hundred and ten years later Kelly Speer, a grad student at AMNH, generated a spreadsheet documenting bats that had been collected throughout the Bahamas, including those […]

By | 2018-10-18T12:50:44+00:00 October 10th, 2018|Categories: Bats, Caves, Featured, Geology|0 Comments

Contemporary and Emerging Fisheries in The Bahamas

A recent, easy-to-read, review paper on the state of fishery resources in The Bahamas. A great starting point for assessing the many conservation challenges ahead.

By | 2018-11-14T19:57:29+00:00 July 9th, 2018|Categories: conservation, Featured, Fishery management, Regulations|0 Comments

Sargassum Accumulations on Caribbean Beaches

Over the last 8 years or so, many Caribbean Islands have been challenged by massive Sargassum algae accumulations on beaches (a Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute fact sheet here, and a high resolution link to the poster here). These accumulations may have many deleterious effects on species that utilize beach habitat, including for nesting turtles. See for instance

By | 2018-11-14T19:59:00+00:00 May 7th, 2018|Categories: Beaches, Featured, Sargassum, Turtles, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Final Project from our Superstar Intern

Here is the final research project on mangrove die-off from our superstar intern Sofia Sanchez-Zarate, from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics. Great job Sofia!

By | 2018-11-14T20:01:36+00:00 March 21st, 2018|Categories: Disease, Featured, Mangroves and Creeks|0 Comments

Dear Sponge – I Am Breaking Up With You

To help us understand the complexities of nature, we often use simple classifications to help wrap our minds various intricacies. Think about how we classify species interactions: predation, mutualisms, parasitisms, commensalisms, etc. Simple. But complications linger in the background. Former NCSU PhD student Stephanie Archer (along with current student Enie Hensel) demonstrated one such complexity in a recent study (full […]

By | 2018-03-18T11:20:09+00:00 March 18th, 2018|Categories: Featured, seagrass, sponge|0 Comments

Antigua to Bahamas hawksbill migration

After finishing nesting on Long Island, Antigua this past summer, this satellite-tagged hawksbill traveled for more than a month to Long Island, Bahamas. The Long Island-to-Long Island migration covered some 1,600 km, one of the longest migrations we have documented at the early stages of our satellite tracking efforts. A cool way to connect study areas among Layman Lab members! […]

By | 2018-11-14T20:03:13+00:00 January 25th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Uncategorized|0 Comments