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Sharks Can Make You Rich

New socio-economic study on the value of sharks in The Bahamas (paper here). The paper Abstract summarizes the findings well:

Elasmobranch populations in The Bahamas offer a unique juxtaposition to the widespread decline of many species around the world, largely due to management and conservation initiatives implemented over the last 25 years. Several industries have been built around the diverse […]

By |February 18th, 2017|Categories: economy, Featured, sharks, tourism|0 Comments

Lobster, clams and chemistry

Guest post from Nicholas Higgs at the University of Plymouth. Thanks Nick!

New research by Bahamian marine scientist Dr Nick Higgs and colleagues has shown that Caribbean spiny lobsters (aka crawfish) get a big chunk of their food from an unusual source. The lobsters hunt down a particular species of clam in seagrass beds that get their energy from chemosynthesis. This helps explain how lobsters […]

By |February 16th, 2017|Categories: Featured, lobster|0 Comments

‘What will happen to the Bahamas when all the Conch is gone?’

“Let’s think about tomorrow, there are some simple rules to follow: preservation, moderation, we need some Conchservation. Conch Gone!”

Under the direction of Lavado Stubbs, ConchBoy films, with several musicians, a new music video came out today to help the conservation of conch for The Bahamas (article here). A widespread effort between entertainers and several conservation and management organizations throughout The Bahamas to give us a glimpse of our future if ‘we do not come together to conserve our precious resource’.  If you need a quick pick me up on this Friday with a great message and tune to go along with it, click HERE!

If you would like to be apart of the Conchservation movement, please sign BNT’s petition HERE to help protect baby conch in The Bahamas.

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By |January 13th, 2017|Categories: Conch, conservation, Current Events, Education, Featured|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Summary of on-going mangrove die-off research

Here is a video update on the on-going mangrove die-off research. See video here.

By |December 16th, 2016|Categories: Featured, Mangroves and Creeks|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Recent work on Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations asks us to rethink current fishing regulations

An exciting new publication just came out helping us better understand Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas (article here). Using acoustic telemetry data, Dr. Craig Dahlgren and others recorded the movements of different sized Nassau grouper to examine when and where individuals would migrate to spawning aggregations. They found that individuals did not migrate to aggregation sites until they were 54 cm in total body length, suggesting a new and increased minimum size limit for fishing regulations on Nassau grouper. To illustrate, current Bahamian regulation permits a minimum catch size of 3 lbs (1.36 kg), which in our own work on Nassau grouper, we have found individuals to weigh over this amount  at 43 cm, ~10 cm less than their potential size of maturation. Furthermore, their movement data also suggests that individuals migrating for the first time were slower than ‘seasoned’ individuals but their swimming speeds were similar on their return home suggesting migration movement behaviors may be learned.
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Hilarious new educational film on our research in Haiti – in Haitian Creole

We have been working with Loggerhead Productions for the past few years on creating films and documentaries about our work in Haiti.  Recently Matt just finished a new education film on our local work in Haiti that we will be distributing around to schools and communities in the area where we are working around Ile A Vache, Haiti.

Are you productive? Or just attractive?

We have posted much about our fish pee research (nutrient provision by the animals in their excretion), using artificial reefs as the experimental tools (here is video footage of one of our most successful reefs). In a recent paper (link here – if interested, the Introduction and Discussion are most relevant to read in detail), we take this research a next […]

By |July 24th, 2016|Categories: Artificial Reefs, Featured, Nutrients|1 Comment
  • congo red plates

Progress with Mangrove Fungus Biotechnology Project

We recently posted about investigating whether the mangrove fungus we find on infected leaves may have potential uses in biotechnology (see here). The images above show how some Pestalotiopsis cultures we have isolated from infected mangrove leaves are able to change the color of a specific dye known as Congo red. When an organism causes a color change of […]

By |July 21st, 2016|Categories: Featured, Mangroves and Creeks|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

New Reefs Are Born: ampil pipi poisson

As an extension of our on-going research in Haiti, we recently kicked off a new artificial reef project.  Working with local fishers, we have constructed two clusters of artificial reefs, one of which the locals will actively use for harvesting fishes and the other that they will collectively protect from fishing. Building on what we have learned from other projects, we have chosen to […]

By |June 18th, 2016|Categories: Artificial Reefs, Education, Featured, Fish, Haiti, Overfishing, seagrass|0 Comments

Is every Nassau grouper the same?

The Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, is an iconic species here in The Bahamas and throughout the Caribbean. They are the highlight of a dive in the tourism industry as well as an extremely important commercial fishery. However, they have been in decline over the last few decades and are currently considered an […]