Fishing reduces fish pee on coral reefs

Yup, more about fish pee.  As a follow-up to work we have been conducting on the importance of fish excretion (pee) for coastal tropic ecosystems, we describe in a recent study how fishing pressure is reducing this source of nutrients by nearly half on coral reefs across the broader Caribbean. This study highlights an alternative way in which human […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52-05:00 August 16th, 2016|Categories: Coral, Current Events, Global change, marine protected areas, Nutrients, Overfishing|0 Comments

Lessons from the International Coral Reef Symposium: “We Must Reduce Carbon Emissions”

Last week some 3000 coral reef scientists, including the world’s foremost leaders in all aspects of coral reef ecosystems, met in Honolulu to discuss the fate of coral reefs.  The goal of this convention, which is held every four years, was to focus on positive action towards improving reef ecosystems. Unfortunately, when studying coral reefs it is difficult to be optimistic. […]

Undergraduate’s Perspective: The Life of Field Research

Research typically starts with asking a question and aims to end with a result…that will inevitably lead to more questions, comparable to a positive feedback loop. But the world of research is not easy, breezy, and beautiful (“Cover Girl”). Challenges await a researcher at every step of the process, from developing the question to the final product of publishing their […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:53-05:00 July 2nd, 2016|Categories: Coral, Undergraduate Research|Tags: , |0 Comments

Parasite named after Bob Marley

Last week out in the field working on our grouper movement project (see here for background) we found an interesting ectoparasite in the gills of a Nassau grouper. After expelling the tiny shrimp-like parasites from the grouper’s gills with a bilge pump, we counted about 800-900 individuals that were each about the size of a flea.  We collected a […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:54-05:00 June 13th, 2016|Categories: Coral, parasites|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Undergraduate’s Perspective: Coral Review

Stemming from my last post (see here), I briefly mentioned coral transplantation and the species I am studying. However, I failed to recognize that a year ago all of the terms, ideas, and experiments were a bunch of individual puzzle pieces that I struggled to put together to get the complete picture. I went to The Bahamas with limited […]

Undergraduate’s Perspective: My Second Field Season

My name is Elisabeth Frasch and I am an undergraduate student in Dr. Craig Layman’s lab. For my College of Natural Resources Enrichment Fund, I am creating blog posts to share with the general public and potential NC State students. I thought I would share them here as well for those who are interested. Enjoy!

The summer of 2016 marks my […]

Gardening coral of our own

We have been talking a lot about the importance of fish pee for tropical coastal ecosystems over the past few years.  Most of this research has focused on the importance of fish pee for seagrasses and algae.  We are now extending these efforts to understand its importance for coral growth and development.

A recent study of ours provides compelling evidence […]

By | 2016-03-07T15:31:50-05:00 March 7th, 2016|Categories: Coral, Current Events, Fish, Nutrients, pollution|2 Comments

ASAC: Complex reefs and predator presence increase fish abundance

Had a great week here on Abaco  presenting my work at the Abaco Science Alliance Conference and getting out in the field to check on my ongoing research.  In short, my work thus far has shown that healthy, structurally complex reefs and the presence  of predators, Nassau grouper, increase total fish abundance on patch reefs. Check out this poster […]

Recent Assessment shows Healthy Coral and Fish Populations in Curaçao

Here is a link to a short article from Curaçao Chronicle stating how well the fish and coral populations are doing along their coastline. A positive and needed article to see during an El Niño year of warm waters that potentially threaten the livelihood of Caribbean reefs.

By | 2015-12-23T12:58:10-05:00 December 23rd, 2015|Categories: Coral, Fish|0 Comments