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Ecological regime shift in the West Atlantic?

Recently, large collaborations between sea turtle monitoring programs in the West Atlantic have identified regional declines in growth rates for loggerheads, hawksbills, and greens. Data were used from in-water capture-recapture studies. Karen Bjorndal of the University of Florida has taken the helm on three papers that address the trends for each of these species.

Notably, all species exhibited increases in growth rates […]

‘New Virtual Dive Gallery Puts National Marine Sanctuaries at the Tip of Your Fingers’

In case anyone needs a quick break, take a virtual snorkel break with NOAA’s beautiful photography gallery.  HERE is a recent article NOAA posted for its debut and the the virtual tours can be found HERE. Enjoy.

 

By |May 16th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Coral, marine protected areas|0 Comments

And another: ‘Have Scientists Been Overestimating our Toll on Reef Sharks?’

Shark populations are declining worldwide and  shark awareness and conservation is necessary. However, some interesting news from a recently published paper suggests that we might be overestimating the density of sharks required on reefs to resemble pristine reefs. This is very exciting, as shark researchers and conservationists’ goals are now potentially more realistic. Read more in this short (650 words, […]

By |March 30th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Overfishing, sharks|Tags: , , |0 Comments

‘What will happen to the Bahamas when all the Conch is gone?’

“Let’s think about tomorrow, there are some simple rules to follow: preservation, moderation, we need some Conchservation. Conch Gone!”

Under the direction of Lavado Stubbs, ConchBoy films, with several musicians, a new music video came out today to help the conservation of conch for The Bahamas (article here). A widespread effort between entertainers and several conservation and management organizations throughout The Bahamas to give us a glimpse of our future if ‘we do not come together to conserve our precious resource’.  If you need a quick pick me up on this Friday with a great message and tune to go along with it, click HERE!

If you would like to be apart of the Conchservation movement, please sign BNT’s petition HERE to help protect baby conch in The Bahamas.

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By |January 13th, 2017|Categories: Conch, conservation, Current Events, Education, Featured|Tags: , , |1 Comment

In the News: ‘Marine Biologist Suggests Conservation Of Bahamas’ Seagrass Habitats’

Short article in the Tribune242 on the importance of seagrass ecosystem conservation. As we have shown why seagrass meadows are critical to protect for nursery habitats(see here), this short article discusses the dependency lobsters have on theses ecosystems. “Dr Nicholas Higgs, Deputy Director of the Marine Institute at Plymouth University, England, said that the ‘high productivity’ of local […]

By |December 11th, 2016|Categories: conservation, lobster, seagrass|Tags: , |1 Comment

National Geographic: Mapping Abaco Blue Holes

One of the most unique natural features that can be found on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas are blue holes. Located along Abaco’s shorelines or inland within the thick of Abaco’s pine forests, these underwater caverns are incredibly extensive and a gem to share. Right now, National Geographic is teaming up with local divers, scientists, and schools to begin mapping the blue hole system in south Abaco. This cave system is potentially the most extensive island cave system in the world. Check out their daily blog HERE to see short videos, shared experiences, and outreach they are doing as local schools take a field trip with Nat Geo.

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By |December 7th, 2016|Categories: Blue Holes, Caves, conservation, Education|Tags: |1 Comment

Recent work on Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations asks us to rethink current fishing regulations

An exciting new publication just came out helping us better understand Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas (article here). Using acoustic telemetry data, Dr. Craig Dahlgren and others recorded the movements of different sized Nassau grouper to examine when and where individuals would migrate to spawning aggregations. They found that individuals did not migrate to aggregation sites until they were 54 cm in total body length, suggesting a new and increased minimum size limit for fishing regulations on Nassau grouper. To illustrate, current Bahamian regulation permits a minimum catch size of 3 lbs (1.36 kg), which in our own work on Nassau grouper, we have found individuals to weigh over this amount  at 43 cm, ~10 cm less than their potential size of maturation. Furthermore, their movement data also suggests that individuals migrating for the first time were slower than ‘seasoned’ individuals but their swimming speeds were similar on their return home suggesting migration movement behaviors may be learned.
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More Than $1 Billion Pledged for Ocean Science, Conservation

Story here.

By |September 21st, 2016|Categories: conservation|0 Comments