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Jacob Allgeier

About Jacob Allgeier

I am an ecologist with broad interests in how human-induced changes alter how ecosystems function and the services that they provide. A central focus of my research is understanding how changes in biodiversity affect the flow of nutrients and energy in ecosystems. Most of this research takes place in tropical coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, seagrass beds, and coral reefs. I am an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

18th century navigation maps reveal extensive losses to Florida Key’s reefs

It appears that declines of coral reefs have been going on longer than we thought. Recent research using old navigation maps from the late 1700s showed that coral reefs in the Florida Keys were much more extensive than previously believed, with the new estimates suggesting a ~50% reduction of total coral reef area (being converted to seagrass beds) since […]

By |September 17th, 2017|Categories: Climate Change, conservation, Coral, Current Events|0 Comments

cargo ships create more lightening

A recent study showed that the smog from massive cargo ships that criss-cross the oceans actually stimulates more lightening (up to twice as much). Another really interesting and really odd way we are altering really major processes on our planet. Short write-up about it can be found here.

By |September 10th, 2017|Categories: pollution|0 Comments

Artificial reefs in Haiti – ampil poisson!

We have been reporting on our long-term artificial reef research in Haiti for a few years now. This year we were pleased to learn that not only did our reefs survive the massive hurricane Mathew, but they also had substantially more fish on them than they did last year. This is a really positive sign that the reefs are providing […]

By |May 11th, 2017|Categories: Artificial Reefs, Fish, Haiti|0 Comments

Fish pee on coral reefs in the Caribbean makes Canadian Broadcasting Company

An interview I did a few months ago for Quarks and Quirks on CBC radio recently aired.  Yes, of course, it is more about fish pee, but I thought I would post it all the same.  It is pretty funny. Scroll down a bit for the actual interview.

Great news for the world’s marine mammals

I am always excited to report positive news (reported at length here).  Starting in the new year, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will require countries exporting seafood to the United States to demonstrate that their fisheries comply with the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA).  The US is the world’s largest seafood importer and the MMPA is among […]

By |December 20th, 2016|Categories: Current Events, Endangered species, Marine Mammals, Overfishing, Policy|1 Comment

Sailfish provide clue to the evolution of group hunting

This video is really cool.

By |November 15th, 2016|Categories: Current Events, Fish, Uncategorized|0 Comments

World’s largest marine reserve established in Antarctica

Big news: within the past few weeks world leaders from 24 nations and the European Union have established the largest marine reserve ever (1,550,00o square km).  This reserve will be divided between no-take and scientific research zones where fishing will be permitted for scientific purposes.  Many are in favor of large no-take reserves, but others have differing opinions.  Ray Hilborne, […]

By |November 3rd, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Swifts can fly for 10 months without stopping

Many of us have heard about the ability of birds to travel long distances. But a recent study published in Current Biology shows that in addition to the remarkable distance swifts fly (often between Europe and Subsaharan Africa), they often don’t even stop along their journey.  A key finding of the study was that the 19 monitored birds spent more than 99% […]

By |October 30th, 2016|Categories: Birds|1 Comment

Signs of resilience in pacific coral reefs

It is truly uplifting to find any positive news about the state of the worlds’ coral reefs anywhere.  A resent research survey found that the reefs around Phoenix Island, a region halfway between Fiji and Hawaii, were teaming with healthy coral.  These corals had previously been devastated in 2003, and had been slow to recover.  Scientists were worried that the recent […]

By |October 1st, 2016|Categories: Climate Change, Coral, Current Events, Global change|1 Comment

Hilarious new educational film on our research in Haiti – in Haitian Creole

We have been working with Loggerhead Productions for the past few years on creating films and documentaries about our work in Haiti.  Recently Matt just finished a new education film on our local work in Haiti that we will be distributing around to schools and communities in the area where we are working around Ile A Vache, Haiti.