Enie Hensel

About Enie Hensel

Broadly my interests lie in exploring the intertwining interactions between top-down and bottom-up mechanisms that have been anthropogenically impacted in coastal ecosystems. Currently, I am investigating how structure complexity and the presence of top predators affect patch reef fish communities in Abaco, The Bahamas.

Reminder: Nassau grouper closed season begins December 1 in The Bahamas

Officially law last year (see here), Nassau grouper fishing season is closed in The Bahamas from December 1st to February 28th. This is to help populations recover and stop unsustainable fishing practices on their spawning aggregations. Let us all do our part and help spread the word.

By | 2016-12-03T13:56:49-05:00 December 1st, 2016|Categories: Fish, Regulations|Tags: , |1 Comment

Recent work on Nassau Grouper spawning aggregations asks us to rethink current fishing regulations

An exciting new publication just came out helping us better understand Nassau grouper populations in The Bahamas (article here). Using acoustic telemetry data, Dr. Craig Dahlgren and others recorded the movements of different sized Nassau grouper to examine when and where individuals would migrate to spawning aggregations. They found that individuals did not migrate to aggregation sites until they […]

Coral restoration: New plans to transplant a million corals in the Caribbean and Florida keys

Here is a short summary of the upcoming plans in restoring hard, reef–building coral species  into the Caribbean and along the southern Floridian coastline. Click here to see what restoration initiatives Mote Marine Lab, The Nature Conservancy, and several other U.S. and international partners have for our coral reefs.

By | 2016-09-13T00:06:22-05:00 September 13th, 2016|Categories: Coral, Restoration|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Nassau grouper recognized under the Endangered Species Act

The U.S. now recognizes Nassau grouper as a Threatened Species under the Endangered Species Act. Nassau grouper have been heavily harvested throughout its native range and many efforts are being placed to recover their populations (see here and here ). Along the Florida coastline they are considered to be commercially extinct, meaning their abundance is too low to harvest. This is […]

By | 2016-06-30T16:20:14-05:00 June 30th, 2016|Categories: Endangered species, Enforcement|Tags: , |0 Comments

New Shark Database Launched

‘To unify shark conservation efforts worldwide, marine life experts have just launched a new database containing information on some of the planet’s most threatened sharks.

The online tool, called the “Database of measures on conservation and management of sharks,” also includes information on threatened skates, rays and chimaeras, which are all related to sharks. It was created by FAO-CITES, […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:54-05:00 June 13th, 2016|Categories: Endangered species, sharks|Tags: , |0 Comments

Parasite named after Bob Marley

Last week out in the field working on our grouper movement project (see here for background) we found an interesting ectoparasite in the gills of a Nassau grouper. After expelling the tiny shrimp-like parasites from the grouper’s gills with a bilge pump, we counted about 800-900 individuals that were each about the size of a flea.  We collected a […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:54-05:00 June 13th, 2016|Categories: Coral, parasites|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Is every Nassau grouper the same?

The Nassau grouper, Epinephelus striatus, is an iconic species here in The Bahamas and throughout the Caribbean. They are the highlight of a dive in the tourism industry as well as an extremely important commercial fishery. However, they have been in decline over the last few decades and are currently considered an […]

NC State’s Undergraduate Research Symposium

Another North Carolina post to congratulate two of our undergraduates who presented their independent research at the  NC State’s Annual Spring Undergraduate Research Symposium. Elisabeth Frasch is an undergraduate in the department of Forestry and Environmental Resources as well as a College of Natural Resources Student Ambassador. Last summer she received a NC State undergraduate fellowship to travel to Abaco, The Bahamas to […]

Shad in the Classroom: North Carolina Outreach

Shad in the Classroom is a hands-on, science learning opportunity for grade school 5-12 run by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in collaboration with the NC Wildlife Resources Commission and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The program is a minimum of two weeks in the classroom spanning topics from fish biology, food web ecology, and stream ecology. […]

By | 2016-04-20T00:21:49-05:00 April 20th, 2016|Categories: Education, Fish|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments