Enie Hensel

About Enie Hensel

Broadly my interests lie in exploring the intertwining interactions between top-down and bottom-up mechanisms that have been anthropogenically impacted in coastal ecosystems. Currently, I am investigating how structure complexity and the presence of top predators affect patch reef fish communities in Abaco, The Bahamas.

Is a closed lobster season enough?

Eric Carey, Bahamas National Trust’s chief executive, was interviewed by the Tribune242 on the current status of Bahamian lobster populations. Within the interview, Carey mentions that Bahamian lobster populations will not be able meet the demand of foreign markets, specifically mentioning the Chinese market, if new regulations are not put in place. In order […]

By | 2017-12-21T10:28:47+00:00 December 21st, 2017|Categories: Current Events, lobster|Tags: , , |0 Comments

‘New Virtual Dive Gallery Puts National Marine Sanctuaries at the Tip of Your Fingers’

In case anyone needs a quick break, take a virtual snorkel break with NOAA’s beautiful photography gallery.  HERE is a recent article NOAA posted for its debut and the the virtual tours can be found HERE. Enjoy.

 

By | 2017-05-16T15:19:13+00:00 May 16th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Coral, marine protected areas|0 Comments

And another: ‘Have Scientists Been Overestimating our Toll on Reef Sharks?’

Shark populations are declining worldwide and  shark awareness and conservation is necessary. However, some interesting news from a recently published paper suggests that we might be overestimating the density of sharks required on reefs to resemble pristine reefs. This is very exciting, as shark researchers and conservationists’ goals are now potentially more realistic. Read more in this short (650 words, […]

By | 2017-03-30T10:30:20+00:00 March 30th, 2017|Categories: conservation, Overfishing, sharks|Tags: , , |0 Comments

‘Tiny Grazers Could Help Save Caribbean Reefs’

Some positive news for our Caribbean coral reefs! Research from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute reports that small algae-eating fish and sea urchins may be taking the place of Diadema, a large sea urchin that suffered severe declines in the 1970s from a widespread disease. Read HERE for more details.

 

By | 2017-01-15T00:20:28+00:00 January 15th, 2017|Categories: Coral, Fish, Invertebrates|Tags: , |0 Comments

‘What will happen to the Bahamas when all the Conch is gone?’

“Let’s think about tomorrow, there are some simple rules to follow: preservation, moderation, we need some Conchservation. Conch Gone!”

Under the direction of Lavado Stubbs, ConchBoy films, with several musicians, a new music video came out today to help the conservation of conch for The Bahamas (article here). A widespread effort between entertainers and several conservation and management organizations […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 January 13th, 2017|Categories: Conch, conservation, Current Events, Education, Featured|Tags: , , |1 Comment

In the News: ‘Marine Biologist Suggests Conservation Of Bahamas’ Seagrass Habitats’

Short article in the Tribune242 on the importance of seagrass ecosystem conservation. As we have shown why seagrass meadows are critical to protect for nursery habitats(see here), this short article discusses the dependency lobsters have on theses ecosystems. “Dr Nicholas Higgs, Deputy Director of the Marine Institute at Plymouth University, England, said that the ‘high productivity’ of local […]

By | 2016-12-11T13:08:22+00:00 December 11th, 2016|Categories: conservation, lobster, seagrass|Tags: , |1 Comment

National Geographic: Mapping Abaco Blue Holes

One of the most unique natural features that can be found on Great Abaco Island, The Bahamas are blue holes. Located along Abaco’s shorelines or inland within the thick of Abaco’s pine forests, these underwater caverns are incredibly extensive and a gem to share. Right now, National Geographic is teaming up with local divers, scientists, and schools to begin mapping […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 December 7th, 2016|Categories: Blue Holes, Caves, conservation, Education|Tags: |1 Comment

Reminder: Nassau grouper closed season begins December 1 in The Bahamas

Officially law last year (see here), Nassau grouper fishing season is closed in The Bahamas from December 1st to February 28th. This is to help populations recover and stop unsustainable fishing practices on their spawning aggregations. Let us all do our part and help spread the word.

By | 2016-12-03T13:56:49+00:00 December 1st, 2016|Categories: Fish, Regulations|Tags: , |1 Comment