Craig Layman

About Craig Layman

My lab’s interdisciplinary pursuits provide for a multi-faceted understanding of environmental change in the coastal realm. We are ecologists, asking questions that span population, community, ecosystem and evolutionary sub-disciplines. We often use a food web based perspective, exploring top-down (e.g., predation) and bottom-up (e.g., nutrient excretion) mechanisms by which animals affect ecosystem processes. All of our efforts are framed within a broader outreach framework, directly integrating science and education, using approaches such as this website.

What an Honor for Jake (and thanks to all on Abaco)

Dr. Jacob Allgeier has been awarded the prestigious Packard Fellowship. This is a tremendous honor. It is a testament to his hard work, as well as to all of the support he has received from numerous folks on Abaco. I am really excited to see what new research will emerge in the coming years from Jake’s lab. […]

By | 2019-11-20T11:58:45-05:00 November 20th, 2019|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

A Transparent Future

When I interviewed for a faculty job at North Carolina State University, a professor asked me: “What is an unsolvable problem in science that you would like to solve?” That is the type question one can never prepare for! I have thought at length about this question, and I always come back to this answer: transparent, complete, and available flow of information […]

By | 2019-11-06T12:39:55-05:00 November 6th, 2019|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Encouraging Comments on Conch Conservation

Encouraging comments from Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Michael Pintard following the recent study on a potential collapse in the conch fishery. I met Minister Pintard recently when a Bahamian delegation visited North Carolina, and he was especially interested in our creek restoration research (see here and here for instance) and the involvement of Bahamian students in […]

By | 2019-01-15T08:43:09-05:00 January 15th, 2019|Categories: Conch, Enforcement, Featured, Overfishing, Regulations|2 Comments

Evolution of Beauty

Another interesting science article in the New York Times yesterday, exploring the evolution of beauty in animals. Want to know why those anoles running around The Bahamas have colorful throat “dewlaps”? This is the article to read.

(Photo from Graham Reynolds; some older posts about anoles here and here and here).

 

By | 2019-01-14T09:12:51-05:00 January 14th, 2019|Categories: Evolution, Lizards|0 Comments

Serenaders of the Seas

A cool article in the New York Times about the complexity, and the real purpose, of humpback whale song. Much of the article is based on this paper that suggests potential “cultural revolutions” in humpback whale songs (paper summary below).

Reports of humpbacks on Abaco (here and here). I actually was fortunate to take a swim with […]

By | 2019-01-13T10:24:02-05:00 January 13th, 2019|Categories: Endangered species, Marine Mammals|1 Comment

Will The Bahamas Have Conch in Twenty Years?

An excellent review paper on the status on the conch fishery in The Bahamas, based on research spanning more than 22 years. Much of this research associated with the organization Community Conch (www.communityconch.org). At the end of the paper find some specific management recommendations, and I include the Abstract below which provides a nice summary…

Broad-scale […]

By | 2019-01-13T10:27:04-05:00 January 10th, 2019|Categories: Conch, Featured, marine protected areas, Overfishing, Regulations|0 Comments

Feeding Island Dreams

Happy New Year. Back from the holidays, we hope to ramp up our posting again.

Here is a new review paper on the potential of “agritourism” in The Bahamas. The authors broadly define this as “Agritourism, also referred to as agro-tourism, farm tourism or farm-based tourism, has a host of definitions but can be understood as a form of tourism […]

By | 2019-01-04T10:11:05-05:00 January 4th, 2019|Categories: agriculture, Andros Island, tourism|0 Comments

Rolling Harbour

We haven’t mentioned the Rolling Harbour website in some time.  If you are not familiar with it, it is a nice site for Bahamas natural history observations. Check it out – here is the latest.

By | 2018-12-03T17:35:20-05:00 December 3rd, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

Droning On (In a Good Way)

Enie Hensel’s drone research featured by NCSU (story here and paper here). Nice job Enie! The paper Abstract to follow….

Large-bodied animals, megafauna, are disproportionately threatened and yet, remain relatively difficult to monitor. This is particularly true in the ocean. Consumer-grade drones have high definition imagery and offer a non-invasive way to monitor a subset of marine megafauna, especially […]

By | 2018-11-26T10:11:16-05:00 November 26th, 2018|Categories: Featured, marine protected areas, sharks, Turtles|0 Comments