Craig Layman

About Craig Layman

My lab’s interdisciplinary pursuits provide for a multi-faceted understanding of environmental change in the coastal realm. We are ecologists, asking questions that span population, community, ecosystem and evolutionary sub-disciplines. We often use a food web based perspective, exploring top-down (e.g., predation) and bottom-up (e.g., nutrient excretion) mechanisms by which animals affect ecosystem processes. All of our efforts are framed within a broader outreach framework, directly integrating science and education, using approaches such as this website.

Global Feeding Habits of Sharks

An interesting new study using stable isotopes to look at the feeding ecology of more than 5,000 individual sharks across 114 species. The cartoon above does a nice job of characterizing this study, and here is a good summary.

By | 2018-01-19T12:31:58+00:00 January 19th, 2018|Categories: Endangered species, Fish, migration, sharks|0 Comments

Are Dogs Cooler than Flamingos?

Kids on Andros Island seem to think so. Researchers from North Carolina State University authored this study, comparing kids’ preferences for animals in The Bahamas and North Carolina. The base question posed was: ““What are your five favorite kinds of wild animals that live in in The Bahamas?”. The most common answer for kids on Andros was…..dogs. Here is […]

By | 2017-12-28T05:48:50+00:00 December 28th, 2017|Categories: Andros Island, Featured, Invasive Species|0 Comments

Hear the roar of the lionfish recorded for the first time

Here is a popular press piece (link here) on the first documented sound production in lionfish. The original paper well qualifies that these data are just preliminary, but very interesting what role this sound production may play. Here is a paragraph from the article with some speculation:

Sound is a critical component of fish social behaviour and sound production […]

By | 2017-12-21T18:46:18+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Categories: Featured, Invasive Species, lionfish|0 Comments

Spider Crabs Could Clean Your Fish’s House

Another cool study out of the Cape Eleuthera Institute (blog post link here). There is relatively little known about this species, despite how common they seem to be in many reef habitats. This is an interesting way to utilize them in an aquaculture context.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Crabs|0 Comments

Hope for economically important Caribbean reefs sharks in The Bahamas

A guest post from Oliver Shipley at the Cape Eleuthera Institute. Photos courtesy of Sean Williams. Thanks Oliver!

Across the Caribbean, overexploitation has led to growing concern regarding the fate of apex predator populations, particularly sharks, which constitute an important structural component of many marine ecosystems. In 2011 The Bahamas outlawed the commercial fishing, and trade of any shark related […]

By | 2017-03-19T11:09:27+00:00 March 19th, 2017|Categories: migration, sharks|0 Comments

Tarpon swim farther that you do

A blog post from Bonefish and Tarpon Trust on the vast extent of tarpon movement patterns. The take home message is, like for so many large marine species, the extent that international collaborations are needed to develop effective conservation strategies.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 17th, 2017|Categories: Fish, migration|0 Comments

What Fish are Left in the Caribbean?

Cool new study by John Bruno’s lab at the University of North Carolina. They surveyed sites across the Caribbean region and use these data to project back to how many fish there used to be before the fishing pressure. Here is a video summary of the paper from the authors, including footage from The Bahamas. Also, some popular press […]

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:51+00:00 March 2nd, 2017|Categories: Overfishing, sharks|0 Comments