Craig Layman

About Craig Layman

My lab’s interdisciplinary pursuits provide for a multi-faceted understanding of environmental change in the coastal realm. We are ecologists, asking questions that span population, community, ecosystem and evolutionary sub-disciplines. We often use a food web based perspective, exploring top-down (e.g., predation) and bottom-up (e.g., nutrient excretion) mechanisms by which animals affect ecosystem processes. All of our efforts are framed within a broader outreach framework, directly integrating science and education, using approaches such as this website.

BirdsCaribbean

Came across this post on the 30th Anniversary of BirdsCaribbean. There are various links that may interest you here. They post periodically on Bahamas birds, including this recent post on the feared extinct Bahama Nuthatch.

By | 2018-10-11T11:44:31+00:00 October 11th, 2018|Categories: Birds, citizen science|0 Comments

Lost and Found: Israel Point Cave

A guest post from Ali Ball. What a cool find! Thanks Ali.

LOST AND FOUND: ISRAEL POINT CAVE

In July of 1904, American zoologist Glover M. Allen visited various caves in Abaco to collect bat specimens.

A hundred and ten years later Kelly Speer, a grad student at AMNH, generated a spreadsheet documenting bats that had been collected throughout the Bahamas, including those […]

By | 2018-10-10T14:36:16+00:00 October 10th, 2018|Categories: Bats, Caves, Geology|0 Comments

David vs. Goliath, Coral Style

An incredible natural history observation of coral polyps teaming up to eat a jellyfish (here is the short article and a summary article from Nat Geo here). Reminds me of our own Betsy Stoner’s documentation of a worm eating upside-down jellyfish.  The ocean is cool.

By | 2018-08-08T21:51:14+00:00 August 8th, 2018|Categories: Coral, food webs, jellyfish|0 Comments

Surveys on climate perceptions and field course efficacy

Here are two recent survey-based papers, one on Bahamian perceptions regarding climate change and the second on how useful Bahamian field courses proved to be for US college students. There are always myriad inherent biases with such surveys, but I found some interesting aspects in each of the studies. They are both easy reads.

By | 2018-08-06T15:00:53+00:00 August 6th, 2018|Categories: Climate Change, conservation|0 Comments

Exuma Park Nominated for International GLORES Award

Here is a note from my colleague Craig Dahlgren that explains the award itself and the commenting process. Would be great for The Bahamas to be recognized for this……

The Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park (ECLSP) is one of nine MPAs to be nominated for international recognition in the Global Ocean Refuge System (GLORES).  The GLORES initiative were established […]

By | 2018-07-22T11:16:13+00:00 July 22nd, 2018|Categories: marine protected areas, Regulations|0 Comments

Contemporary and Emerging Fisheries in The Bahamas

A recent, easy-to-read, review paper on the state of fishery resources in The Bahamas. A great starting point for assessing the many conservation challenges ahead.

By | 2018-07-09T00:46:14+00:00 July 9th, 2018|Categories: conservation, Fishery management, Regulations|0 Comments

Bonefish Migrations

Summer is flying by, so time to get Abaco Scientist going again. Here is an article on bonefish migrations from the spring I keep forgetting to post. I saw a spawning aggregation on Abaco and it was absolutely amazing. Lots more here soon.

By | 2018-07-07T19:19:37+00:00 July 7th, 2018|Categories: bonefish, Fish, migration|0 Comments

Sargassum Accumulations on Caribbean Beaches

Over the last 8 years or so, many Caribbean Islands have been challenged by massive Sargassum algae accumulations on beaches (a Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute fact sheet here, and a high resolution link to the poster here). These accumulations may have many deleterious effects on species that utilize beach habitat, including for nesting turtles. See for instance

By | 2018-05-07T10:30:51+00:00 May 7th, 2018|Categories: Beaches, Sargassum, Turtles, Uncategorized|1 Comment