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Craig Layman

About Craig Layman

My lab’s interdisciplinary pursuits provide for a multi-faceted understanding of environmental change in the coastal realm. We are ecologists, asking questions that span population, community, ecosystem and evolutionary sub-disciplines. We often use a food web based perspective, exploring top-down (e.g., predation) and bottom-up (e.g., nutrient excretion) mechanisms by which animals affect ecosystem processes. All of our efforts are framed within a broader outreach framework, directly integrating science and education, using approaches such as this website.

Dolphin Smoke Weed (Sort of)

I really cant tell if this is fake news, but if not it is amazing. Dolphin getting high on pufferfish (video link here).

By |April 6th, 2017|Categories: Marine Mammals|1 Comment

Spider Crabs Could Clean Your Fish’s House

Another cool study out of the Cape Eleuthera Institute (blog post link here). There is relatively little known about this species, despite how common they seem to be in many reef habitats. This is an interesting way to utilize them in an aquaculture context.

By |March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Crabs|0 Comments

Hope for economically important Caribbean reefs sharks in The Bahamas

A guest post from Oliver Shipley at the Cape Eleuthera Institute. Photos courtesy of Sean Williams. Thanks Oliver!

Across the Caribbean, overexploitation has led to growing concern regarding the fate of apex predator populations, particularly sharks, which constitute an important structural component of many marine ecosystems. In 2011 The Bahamas outlawed the commercial fishing, and trade of any shark related […]

By |March 19th, 2017|Categories: migration, sharks|0 Comments

Tarpon swim farther that you do

A blog post from Bonefish and Tarpon Trust on the vast extent of tarpon movement patterns. The take home message is, like for so many large marine species, the extent that international collaborations are needed to develop effective conservation strategies.

By |March 17th, 2017|Categories: Fish, migration|0 Comments

What Fish are Left in the Caribbean?

Cool new study by John Bruno’s lab at the University of North Carolina. They surveyed sites across the Caribbean region and use these data to project back to how many fish there used to be before the fishing pressure. Here is a video summary of the paper from the authors, including footage from The Bahamas. Also, some popular press […]

By |March 2nd, 2017|Categories: Overfishing, sharks|0 Comments

Hammerhead shark migration gives new hope for conservation

Press release today on new shark research out of the Bimini research station. The full paper can be found here.

By |February 28th, 2017|Categories: migration, sharks|0 Comments

Smog of the Sea

A good video on the plastic accumulations in the Sargasso Sea. You can stream live for a limited time. Coincides with the announcement of the UN War on Plastic.

By |February 28th, 2017|Categories: Policy, pollution|0 Comments

Sharks Can Make You Rich

New socio-economic study on the value of sharks in The Bahamas (paper here). The paper Abstract summarizes the findings well:

Elasmobranch populations in The Bahamas offer a unique juxtaposition to the widespread decline of many species around the world, largely due to management and conservation initiatives implemented over the last 25 years. Several industries have been built around the diverse […]

By |February 18th, 2017|Categories: economy, Featured, sharks, tourism|0 Comments

Mosquitofish Risky Business

A day of guest posts – this from Justa Heinen-Kay. Thanks Justa!

Imagine yourself walking down a street in a town known for its low crime rate. How would you behave? Would you explore new areas? Would you walk by yourself? Now imagine yourself walking down a similar street, but in a neighborhood known to have a high murder rate. Would […]

By |February 16th, 2017|Categories: Blue Holes, Fish|1 Comment

Lobster, clams and chemistry

Guest post from Nicholas Higgs at the University of Plymouth. Thanks Nick!

New research by Bahamian marine scientist Dr Nick Higgs and colleagues has shown that Caribbean spiny lobsters (aka crawfish) get a big chunk of their food from an unusual source. The lobsters hunt down a particular species of clam in seagrass beds that get their energy from chemosynthesis. This helps explain how lobsters […]

By |February 16th, 2017|Categories: Featured, lobster|0 Comments