Illegal Harvest and Colonial Governance

Each summer NCSU professors Nils Peterson and Brian Langerhans teach a course at Forfar Field Station. As part of this course, they always include a sociological study on Andros. This year they looked at local peoples’ opinions on illegal harvesting and use their thoughts to speculate on some of the drivers of this issue. An easy to read, interesting, paper. The Abstract is below, but it actually belies the depth of the paper itself.

We used a qualitative case study on Andros Island, The Bahamas, to explore illegal harvest of marine resources as it relates to colonialism. Data collection included interviews with local informants who participated in harvest of marine resources (n = 62), observations and field notes. Residents considered illegal harvest of marine resources ubiquitous, and viewed using marine resources when and where they choose as an appropriate continuation of traditional livelihoods. Residents also perceived both overharvest and regulations constraining harvest as issues pertaining to outside colonial influences. These findings suggest an increased focus on colonial governance may provide insight and more sustainable solutions for marine resource management where traditional harvesting activities are designated as illegal by outside regulators.

By | 2018-11-19T22:01:13+00:00 November 19th, 2018|Categories: Featured, Overfishing, Policy, Regulations|0 Comments

About the Author:

Craig Layman
My lab’s interdisciplinary pursuits provide for a multi-faceted understanding of environmental change in the coastal realm. We are ecologists, asking questions that span population, community, ecosystem and evolutionary sub-disciplines. We often use a food web based perspective, exploring top-down (e.g., predation) and bottom-up (e.g., nutrient excretion) mechanisms by which animals affect ecosystem processes. All of our efforts are framed within a broader outreach framework, directly integrating science and education, using approaches such as this website.

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