18th century navigation maps reveal extensive losses to Florida Key’s reefs

It appears that declines of coral reefs have been going on longer than we thought. Recent research using old navigation maps from the late 1700s showed that coral reefs in the Florida Keys were much more extensive than previously believed, with the new estimates suggesting a ~50% reduction of total coral reef area (being converted to seagrass beds) since this time. It seems Caribbean coral have had it bad for much longer that we had previously thought.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:50+00:00 September 17th, 2017|Categories: Climate Change, conservation, Coral, Current Events|0 Comments

About the Author:

Jacob Allgeier

I am an ecologist with broad interests in how human-induced changes alter how ecosystems function and the services that they provide. A central focus of my research is understanding how changes in biodiversity affect the flow of nutrients and energy in ecosystems. Most of this research takes place in tropical coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, seagrass beds, and coral reefs.

I am an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

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