Fishing reduces fish pee on coral reefs

Yup, more about fish pee.  As a follow-up to work we have been conducting on the importance of fish excretion (pee) for coastal tropic ecosystems, we describe in a recent study how fishing pressure is reducing this source of nutrients by nearly half on coral reefs across the broader Caribbean. This study highlights an alternative way in which human activity is altering the health and function of coral reefs globally.  See here for more complete coverage on the article.

By | 2017-12-01T14:01:52+00:00 August 16th, 2016|Categories: Coral, Current Events, Global change, marine protected areas, Nutrients, Overfishing|0 Comments

About the Author:

Jacob Allgeier

I am an ecologist with broad interests in how human-induced changes alter how ecosystems function and the services that they provide. A central focus of my research is understanding how changes in biodiversity affect the flow of nutrients and energy in ecosystems. Most of this research takes place in tropical coastal ecosystems such as mangroves, seagrass beds, and coral reefs.

I am an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.

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