Corn snakes on Grand Bahama, a few recent observations

A pair of corn snakes copulating. This excellent photo was taken southeast of Freeport in early July of 2014 and sent in by a resident of the area who found this pair and others around her garden.

A pair of corn snakes copulating. This excellent photo was taken southeast of Freeport in early July of 2014 and sent in by a resident of the area who found this pair and others around her garden.

We’ve been posting about Corn snakes found in the Bahamas for a while, but now we have some new observations from Grand Bahama, too (note, that Corn snakes have been on Grand Bahama since at least the mid 1990’s.)

Both observations come from a resident that lives on the south shore of Grand Bahama near The Grand Lucayan Golf course.  The first observations were reported back in early May.

A resident found two different snakes near her house and sent a photo of one to confirm the identification. This one looks like it got hit by a car.

A resident found two different snakes near her house and sent a photo of one to confirm the identification. This one looks like it got hit by a car.

More recently, this same resident sent along a pretty cool photo of two corn snakes intertwined from the same property. I am guessing that these two are copulating! That said, males of some snake species engage in a sort of wrestling match that can appear similar to copulation making me a little uncertain about what exactly these two are up to. However, I don’t know if corn snakes ‘wrestle’, so I am willing to say that these two are probably a mating pair. Notable is the numbers reported from this property…at least 4 in a little over three months!

Another interesting aspect of these reports is that the area from where these guys are reported is near a golf course. Besides this report, many of the observations from within the introduced range of Corn snakes in the Caribbean are near golf courses: Abaco observations are all near Winding Bay, and Cayman Islands reports are from a golf course behind Seven Mile Beach. There are a lot of golf courses in the Bahamas and many Corn snake reports originate from areas that are not golf courses, but I still wonder if there is a connection here. For example, perhaps watering provides additional moisture or some kind of food resource for these snakes, or maybe the importation of palms from the US is a route of introduction as we speculated earlier (HERE, & HERE).

Please keep on sending in your corn snake observations. Reporting of behaviors, habitats, and distributions can contribute significantly to our understanding of this introduced species.

Thanks and keep ’em coming!

By | 2017-12-01T14:02:32-05:00 July 12th, 2014|Categories: herpetology, Invasive Species|10 Comments

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  1. Avatar
    Fred Riger December 2, 2014 at 8:46 am

    I’ve seen corn snakes on Grand Bahama since I started taking walks around my neighborhood in 1984.

  2. Sean Giery
    Sean Giery December 2, 2014 at 12:51 pm

    Hi Fred,

    That would push the introduction date back a decade or so. Your 1984 date aligns well with when corn snakes were first observed in the Caribbean region, i.e. 1985 on Grand Cayman.

    If you can, would you mind providing some basic geographic data of where you saw them back then, as well as where you currently see them?

    Thanks for the info!

    Sean

  3. Avatar
    Donald Billiot April 13, 2017 at 9:42 am

    Seen one April 11, 2017 on Harbor Island, on a path along the water’s edge . Between Valentine’s Marina and Romora Bay Marina.

  4. Avatar
    Adam Williamson May 22, 2017 at 8:18 pm

    Found one in our neighborhood here in New Providence.

  5. Avatar
    John July 3, 2017 at 9:27 pm

    Found one in my ac vent in western New Providence just over 5 ft. Claims are someone kept them as pets in the area and then let them into the wild. They may have cross breeded so can’t guarantee they are not poisonous

  6. Sean Giery
    Sean Giery December 14, 2017 at 6:28 pm

    Hi John,
    Thank for sharing your observation! Corn snakes are often be found around houses. They eat rodents, lizards, and birds, and find shelter underneath boards. But like all other species of snake in The Bahamas, they aren’t venomous or dangerous to humans in any way. They are also unlikely to have hybridized with any species found in The Bahamas. The most injurious effect of corn snakes is their potential to have negative effects on native Bahamian wildlife. Corn snakes will eat birds and bird eggs and they’re good climbers too! Their taste for birds makes them a serious risk for unique and endangered Bahamian birds like Abaco parrots. Anyways, thanks again for sharing your observation. Comments like yours help us keep track of where corn snakes are in The Bahamas and what they’re doing.

  7. Avatar
    andreas February 23, 2018 at 6:49 pm

    Alexandra Gardiner , who lives on Grand Bahamas , found one in her kitchen. Her cat brought it in dead.

  8. Avatar
    Pamela Heastie August 4, 2019 at 12:37 pm

    Nassau Bahamas. Found a corn snake in the back yard in the Perpall Tract area, Western District, Nassau/New Providence.

  9. Avatar
    Heather December 17, 2019 at 8:11 am

    Youngish dead corn snake on the road outside Lucaya International School, Chesapeake Drive, Freeport. 16th December 2019. 2ft long. Russet patches on fawn colour.

  10. Avatar
    Sidney Whyms December 23, 2019 at 4:58 pm

    Found a corn snake in the coral harbour area

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