Turtles from Bermuda to Abaco

Lory Kenyon took this photo of an Abaco green turtle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Details and a map after the jump.  Cool stuff!  Thanks to Dr. Jim Fourqurean for
the information on the next page.  Make sure and visit the Tour de Turtles
website for more information.

Remember you can always click these photos to enlarge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background – we put satellite tags on 3 turtles in Bermuda this July/August as part of a study of home range and habitat utilization on the Bermuda platform.  We expected these turtles to show the same behaviors as other tagged turtles on Bermuda – that is, to stay within about 500m of where they were tagged for years.  But, we managed to pick two turtles that had finished their growing up in Bermuda and left the platform, on their way to mating grounds (we think in Nicaragua, but we’ll see).  The satellite tags give 2 kinds of position data – relatively imprecise Argos satellite locations similar to old fashioned LORAN, and GPS.  The only other data on where the turtles go after leaving Bermuda to date came from a flipper tag from a Bermuda turtle collected from a fisherman in Nicaragua.  An NGO also tagged two additional turtles – look at the public education web site “Tour de Turtles” http://www.tourdeturtles.org/Bermuda/ to get some more background.  This web page was intended as a lesson in geography and conservation biology for Bermuda school kids.

 

By | 2017-12-01T14:04:36+00:00 November 10th, 2012|Categories: Turtles, Uncategorized|2 Comments

About the Author:

Craig Layman
My lab’s interdisciplinary pursuits provide for a multi-faceted understanding of environmental change in the coastal realm. We are ecologists, asking questions that span population, community, ecosystem and evolutionary sub-disciplines. We often use a food web based perspective, exploring top-down (e.g., predation) and bottom-up (e.g., nutrient excretion) mechanisms by which animals affect ecosystem processes. All of our efforts are framed within a broader outreach framework, directly integrating science and education, using approaches such as this website.

2 Comments

  1. Olivia November 14, 2012 at 7:57 pm

    Here’s another article about the turtle (Tucker) that traveled from Bermuda to The Bahamas:
    http://www.royalgazette.com/article/20121114/NEWS07/711149930

  2. maria lucy August 17, 2015 at 12:46 am

    Very beautiful blog.Here showing so many attractive picture.I really like this blog.
    Thanks.

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